In the News

Press Release: The Hitchcock Center for the Environment announces the release of its Nature Play and Learning Places Master Plan

The Hitchcock Center for the Environment is proud to announce the release of its Nature Play and Learning Places Master Plan. This plan is integral to the Center’s vision to create a worldclass environmental learning center. The Master Plan will complement the Center’s new 9,000 square foot “living” building, designed and constructed to meet highest standard of sustainability in the built environment through the Living Building Challenge™.

Published in In the News on March 14, 2018.

Amherst continues its education in zero-energy construction

By Scott Merzbach

AMHERST — Backers of the bylaw adopted at Town Meeting last fall mandating that all new municipal buildings produce as much energy as they use are continuing to bring experts in zero-energy design and construction to town.

Published in In the News on February 19, 2018.

Randhir Recognized in Mexico for Environmental Sustainability Exchange

Professor Timothy Randhir of the department of environmental conservation was recognized last month as a distinguished visitor by the mayor of Tuxtla-Gutierrez, the capital of the state of Chiapas, Mexico. Randhir led an expert delegation of environmental professionals from western Massachusetts that visited Chiapas from Jan. 14-24 as a part of a professional exchange program funded by the U.S. Department of State.

Published in In the News on February 1, 2018.

‘Forest Fridays’ let kindergarten students learn about nature through play


FLORENCE — Along with art, music and physical education, kindergarten teacher Andrea Egitto says nature exploration should be part of the curriculum.

Published in In the News on January 31, 2018.

Press Release: Hitchcock Center’s Apollo 13 Challenge Rouses Educators

Franklin County, MA – Inspired by the film depicting America’s third Moon landing mission, on Friday, December 8, Hitchcock Center for the Environment will lead an innovative Science and Engineering professional development program for 60 Pre-K through 6th grade teachers in the Union 38 School District. 

Published in In the News on December 8, 2017.

Nature deficit disorder is a thing and it’s disturbing

By Micky Rathbun

I learned of a disturbing new syndrome last week at a benefit for the Hitchcock Center for the Environment in Amherst: nature deficit disorder. OK, it’s not a medically recognized term, but it’s very real.

Published in In the News on November 30, 2017.

Editorial: Monday mix on ‘Trail Lady’; climate summit; training activists

About 40 students from Amherst Regional, Hampshire Regional, Northampton and Holyoke high schools used two environmental organizations as their laboratory earlier this month during the first Western Massachusetts Youth Climate Summit.

Published in In the News on November 26, 2017.

Summit gives youth look into local group’s fight against climate change

Throughout the day Friday, about 40 area high school students got to see firsthand how two local environmental organizations are confronting the challenges posed by a warming planet. The inaugural Western Mass Youth Climate Summit took place at the Hitchcock Center for the Environment in Amherst and the Mass Audubon headquarters at the Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary in Easthampton.

Published in In the News on November 17, 2017.

Editorial: Welcome decisions on energy, housing, pool

Town Meeting on Nov. 8 voted 123-54 for the bylaw that mandates construction so all new and expanded town buildings produce, through renewable sources, as much energy as they consume. Supporters of the measure, led by Mothers Out Front and Climate Action Now, believe that Amherst is the first town in the state to adopt such a bylaw.

Published in In the News on November 16, 2017.

Building without toxins: Hitchcock Center shows how it’s done

By Maureen Turner for Going Green

Hitchcock Center serves as a powerful teaching tool for the rest of us.

Signs of the Hitchcock Center for the Environment’s commitment to sustainability are evident all around its South Amherst site: the large solar array on its roof, the rain barrels at the bottom of downspouts, the station for refilling water bottles in a hallway, the composting toilets in the restrooms. But many of the green measures the center took in constructing its new home, which opened in 2016, are not immediately visible to the eye. At a recent event, “Building without Toxins: Educating for a Healthy Material World,” the nonprofit organization highlighted some of those less immediately obvious measures, the result of thoughtful, even painstaking decisions made at every step of the construction process.

Published in In the News, Living Building Project on November 9, 2017.
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