Field Trip Programs on School Grounds

No matter what your schoolyard looks like, it is a unique ecosystem where plants and animals interact with each other and their environment. In these field trips, students explore the school grounds, practicing the skills of observation, data collection and analysis to increase their understanding of the interdependence of living things and earth’s systems in the schoolyard web of life. 

All field trips address the Massachusetts Curriculum Standards for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (S.T.E.M.) which are provided for each field trip below.

Group numbers will be determined by the current CDC guidelines at the time of the program. Our goal is to accommodate one class.

Animals in Winter

Animals in Winter |

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

We will explore animal homes, food, signs and various adaptations that animals use for surviving in the cold, snowy months.

 
Insect Investigations

Insect Investigations |

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

Students will learn about the science of entomology through a live insect lab, and will collect insects, and their non-insect relatives, in various habitats on our trails.

 
Life of a Tree

Life of a Tree | ,

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

Students will have the opportunity to sharpen their observation skills as they explore life in and around a tree.

 

New! Plants and Animals in the Schoolyard |

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

Students will explore the diversity of life on their school grounds by observing, collecting and recording data.

 

New! The Schoolyard is an Ecosystem! | ,

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

No matter what your schoolyard looks like, it is a unique ecosystem where plants and animals interact with each other and their environment.

 
Pond Ecosystems

Pond Ecosystems |

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Cost: per classroom
Duration:

Students will collect and observe a diversity of fascinating animals and plants whose adaptations to living in water are truly astonishing.

 
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Hitchcock Center for the Environment