COVID-19 and the Hitchcock Center

The Hitchcock Center is offering outdoor, small-group, in-person programs for Spring and Summer 2021, during Phase 4 of the Massachusetts reopening plan. Registration is open. And while our building is still closed to the public, we have special resources that you can access until it is safe for us to open again.


 

Forest Bathing at the Hitchcock Center

Come experience a guided Forest therapy walk with Todd Lynch, certified ANFT guide. Learn more and register.

We’re Hiring!

The Hitchcock Center is hiring for several positions. Do you know someone who would like to work with our team? Learn more and apply…

 

With underwriting support for operations and programs provided by:

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Earth matters

"Earth Matters" is in the Daily Hampshire Gazette every two weeks.

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Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Hitchcock Center educator Katie Koerten is outside with her family letting us know what is emerging and blooming. Follow along as we share her discoveries. Today's post is on common milkweed.
Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Here’s the June 15 online edition of Earth Matters (published in the paper on June 12) by Kari Blood. President Biden has announced an initiative called 30x30 - to conserve 30% of the country’s lands and waters by 2030. If he’s looking for a success story to use as an example, the Silvio O. Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge - our own back yard - is a standout. Kari describes the scope and organization of the Conte Refuge, named after the man who represented this part of Massachusetts in the U.S. House for many years.
Enjoy - both the column and the refuge!

P.S. If you’re unable to access the Gazette page, wait a few days and go to the Hitchcock Center website, www.hitchcockcenter.org, where you’ll find the article on the home page.
Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Hitchcock Center for the Environment
Cornus canadensis is a native, low-growing member of the dogwood family. Also known as bunchberry, this plant grows only 4"-9" high, and prefers shady, moist, acidic soils in cool and cold climates. It spreads through rhizomes and makes an attractive groundcover once established. Photo by Katie Koerten.

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Hitchcock Center for the Environment